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Stitch Fix vs Threadbeast

Stitch Fix vs Threadbeast
Latest posts by Erin Jamieson (see all)

Ever need an outfit for an event and don’t have time to go shopping? I’m someone who doesn’t always have time to shop in person- buying clothing online isn’t always easy. From questionable quality to things not fitting right, there’s a reason why I often shop in stores. But clothing subscriptions like Stitch Fix and ThreadBeast claim to provide a personalized alternative, with styling and clothes shipped to you in monthly boxes. 

As exciting as it is to see the world of clothing evolve, I was curious if either Stitch Fix or Threadbeast was worth the price. From sizing to style options, I looked deeper into both companies and discovered some startling similarities and differences. 

Here’s my honest review of Stitch Fix vs ThreadBeast- and everything you need to know before exchanging your regular shopping trip for essentials for an online option. 

Bottom Line Up Front Summary

Gone are the days when you have to shop for clothes in person. But online shopping is pretty tricky- especially if you’re like me and prefer to try clothes on. That’s why clothing subscription services like Stitch Fix and ThreadBeast seem like a clever solution to shopping in person. Both offer versatile clothes for everyday wear, but that’s where the biggest advantages end. 

I cannot fully recommend either ThreadBeast over Stitch Fix. Stitch Fix offers a nice selection of sizes for all people, while ThreadBeast does a better job of catering to men looking for casual clothing. While both offer fair prices, both don’t deliver when it comes to personalization, customer service, and refunds. My review explains why I can’t fully recommend either- and offers some great alternatives under my final recommendations. 

Main Differences Stitch Fix vs ThreadBeast

  • Stitch Fix offers clothes for men, women, and kids, whereas ThreadBeast offers clothes for men only 
  • Stitch Fix allows you to pick and choose what you buy (with a $20 fee), whereas ThreadBeast sends you clothing to keep 
  • Stitch Fix has over 1,000 brands across styles, whereas ThreadBeast has streetwear and athletic men’s brands 
  • Stitch Fix has a short return window, whereas ThreadBeast only accepts exchanges for a different size 

Is Stitch Fix or Threadbeast the Better Subscription? 

Stitch Fix and ThreadBeast both claim to offer stylish and personalized clothing- shipped to your door. But as good as that sounds, my comparison will show some critical differences between these two companies- and help you decide if a membership to either is worth your time and money. 

Company History 

Stitch Fix and ThreadBeast may both be clothing subscription services- but their company history paves a different trajectory. The reason why I found the company’s ups and downs important is because it shows me what each is focused on, and, potentially, what we can expect for quality and customer service. 

Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix

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Stitch Fix had a promising start, founded in 2011 under the name, Rack Habit. Seven years later, they exceeded 1 billion dollars in sales. Thorough they’ve had over 3.4 million customers, the story isn’t quite that smooth. In 2022, 15 percent of their employees were laid off in an attempt to downsize. In that previous year, the CEO issued a public apology for customer complaints. While it’s one of the most popular clothing subscriptions of all time, the post-2020 years haven’t been Stitch Fix’s best. 

ThreadBeast

ThreatBeast

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ThreadBeast started 4 years later than Stitch Fix. 2015 is a hot time for emerging clothing subscriptions, and ThreadBeast was one of the many to gain traction. There aren’t many major headlines about ThreadBeast or major shifts in management. They’ve retained a fairly consistent consumer base and services. 

Winner: ThreadBeast

While ThreadBeast hasn’t gotten as much coverage as Stitch Fix, that’s also a positive thing. Impressed as I am by the scale of Stitch Fix’s business, ThreadBeast has had a more consistent, smoother run. 

Who It’s For (Men, Women, Sizes)

Make or break for some, Stitch Fix and ThreadBeast have rather different consumer bases in mind. 

Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix

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I see why Stitch Fix attracted so many. It’s continued to evolve and include more and more consumers, carrying clothing for men, women, children, plus size women,  maternity, tall & big men, and even women’s Petites. As someone who’s barely 5’4” and has several relatives shorter than me, I will say it’s refreshing to see this range of sizes. In short: Stitch Fix has sizing for a wide range of people, and I hope more and more companies follow suit. 

ThreadBeast

ThreatBeast

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ThreadBeast, for better or worse, has a far narrower focus. They only carry men’s clothing. The positive side is that it’s still more size-inclusive than a lot of clothing subscriptions. Size range from small to 3XL for shirts; 30- 44 for pants, and sizes 8 -13 for shoes. 

Winner: Stitch Fix

If you’re looking for men’s clothes, ThreadBeast still offers a solid range of sizes. But anyone looking for women’s or kid’s clothes won’t find anything for them at ThreadBeast. It’s not so much that this makes ThreadBeast worse- just focused on a smaller consumer base. 

Brands & Styles 

Whether you’re looking for a specific brand or a style of clothing, the truth is that one size does not fit all. This reminds me of when I’m shopping in a store at my local mall: sometimes I see items I like, but would not personally wear or need. So this category is less about which is ‘better; and more about which fits your lifestyle more. 

Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix

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If you want a clothing subscription with tons of brands, Stitch Fix may just be the one with the most. They have over 1,000 brands- some more well-known than others- as well as their line of clothing. Examples of popular brands include Tom’s, Kate Spade, Free People, Sperry’s, and more. I’d love to be able to see the full list of brands, but you can see the brands shortlist here. The focus is on casual and versatile brands, not luxury, and usually not budget.  

Style-wise, Stitch Fix leans most towards casual dressy, but they cover most everything, from a few athletic choices to work clothes and casual nights out. It’s a fair range of style types, from boho to classic to simple. They aren’t the best choice for formal wear or especially alternative looks, but I do think that Stitch Fix styles fit an average lifestyle. 

ThreadBeast

ThreatBeast

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ThreadBeast has a rather different approach- and style. They focus on trendy street style, athletic, and classic casual brands, including Levi’s, Nike, Hurley, Van’s, Elwood, and others. You can View Brands Here or even email for a full list of brands- which I appreciate. 

ThreadBeast leans more towards athletic and casual streetwear styles- and many of them are geared toward a more trendy, youthful look. The three main styles are: casual and relaxed; crisp and clean, and anything goes. Of these, the crisp and clean offers the more dressed up (but dressy casual) looks, while anything goes is a mix of all three. 

While some pieces could be worn to causal business places, the focus is heavily on comfort and casual looks- so it’s not the place to shop for formal business attire or formal occasions. 

Winner: Tie 

Once again, it’s not so much a matter of what’s better as what makes sense for that customer or business. Both companies offer a nice range of well-known and lesser-known brands, and there’s a decent degree of variety. I wish that ThreadBeast would say how many brands they carry- but it’s certainly less than Stitch Fix. Then again, keep in mind that ThreadBeast only carries clothing for men, so having fewer brands makes sense. Aside from quantity, the quality of the brands is fairly even. 

Both Stitch Fix and ThreadBeast could do a bit more for formal and business clothing offerings. Though Stitch Fix has some, I’d use either service more for casual and everyday wear. 

Subscription Options 

How Stitch Fix and ThreadBeast work is fairly similar. It’s the prices and some little details that make a difference- and may make one initially more appealing than the other. 

Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix, like many competitors, applies a $20 styling fee for every “Fix” or box you receive, and you have a choice of how often you receive a styled box, and what features are included:

Stitch Fix Plan Frequency 
Refresh 2-3 Weeks 
Monthly  Per Month 
Update Every 2 Months 
Quarterly  Every 3 Months 

I like this flexibility, and I also like that you’re only paying $20 upfront. In print, at least, you can change your box frequency or cancel at any time by logging into your account. 

ThreadBeast

ThreadBeast also has a few subscription options- but everything is shipped monthly. Instead, the plans change what clothes you receive. Keep in mind that this fee includes the styling fee and the clothes you’re receiving. With Stitch Fix, you’re paying for the styling fee and then any clothes you decide to buy.

Plan  Cost (2022)/ Month What You Get 
Basic Plan $60  2-3 Tops /Accessories
Essential Plan $95 4-5 Tops, Bottoms & Accessories 
Premium Plan $150 6-7 Tops, Bottoms, Accessories
Baller Plan $290 9-11 Shirts, Outwear, Bottoms, Accessories, Shoes (Pair of Shoes in Every Package)

Just like Stitch Fix, you can pause or cancel your plan by logging into your account online. I like the different options for how many items you get, but I wish they had different shipping frequencies. While it looks expensive on paper, you are “buying” clothes and paying for a styling fee- so it’s not nearly expensive as it seems. 

You can make exchanges in case something doesn’t fit you. 

Winner: Tie

This is tough because an argument could be made for either Stitch Fix or ThreadBeast offering better plans. Someone like me, who buys new clothing infrequently and is picky, is better suited for a plan like Stitch Fix. But someone who needs more frequent wardrobe updates and who buys clothes every month anyway are getting a decent deal from ThreadBeast, considering this covers the cost of the styling fee and the clothes. 

Styling & Personalization

One of the biggest draws to online clothing subscriptions? Hint: it’s not just the convenience. Personalized styling and quizzes are supposed to give you the same customer experience as if you were shopping in-store. Here’s how both Stitch Fix and ThreadBeast handle that. 

Stitch Fix

Stitches Fix

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Stitch Fix starts with a styling quiz where you’re asked about several details to build an online style profile. Styles, brands, how formal you want your clothes, sizing, and other queries all seem helpful. The quiz is easy- even enjoyable- to take. From there, a stylist works with your results and the algorithm to select clothes to include in your shipment.

 While the quiz is fairly detailed, there’s been a decline- according to other customers- in how personalized these selections seem. More and more customers are discussing how their requests weren’t heard- from the wrong style to getting items they specifically asked to be included. In short? It’s a good system on paper, but something behind the scenes needs to be fine-tuned. I guess that the downsizing of stylists may be related to these complaints. 

ThreadBeast

ThreatBeast

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ThreadBeast’s model is fairly similar. You take a quiz asking about your style preferences. The focus is a little different. While Stitch Fix shows you example clothing, ThreadBeast asks about wider topics, like color range, style range, general fit, stores you like, and sizes. 

Asking for your height and weight is smart for the best fit possible- rather than relying on standard sizing alone. You can also link your Instagram (optional) to give them a sense of your style. In many ways, this quiz does a better job of getting into your style- and making size considerations if a brand runs small or large. 

Stylists take these results and curate boxes for you. You can also make a special request by emailing [email protected]. While they don’t promise to fulfill every request, it’s a nice touch to their services. While the idea of a surprise box makes someone like me a little nervous, it turns out most customers feel like the quality and styles match their expectations (more on this later). 

Winner: ThreadBeast

ThreadBeast isn’t perfect- and you are leaving some things up to chance. But the option to email a stylist and link your Instagram account is a big plus. The quiz is a nice way to create your style profile, and all in all, it’s just better in execution than Stitch Fix. 

Shipping, Returns, and Refunds

Shipping and returns are central to both Stitch Fix and ThreadBeast’s business models- so knowing the return window and other policies is oh so important. It’s even more important if you, like me, and so many others, have a busy schedule. 

Stitch Fix

Stitches Fix

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Stitch Fix is, by nature, a return system. That means that, unless you want to buy and pay for the clothes in your box, you have to ship items (any unwanted) back. I was a little taken aback when I found out that you have a mere 3 days to try on clothes and send them back. I abolsultey recommend requesting to extend your try-on window– but this is an additional step and request that needs to be made. For returns to be accepted, it has to include all tags and be in the same condition as when you received them.

If you use their Freestyle option (box by the box rather than a monthly subscription), you have 30 days to return the clothing. You can’t refund a styling fee, however. 

ThreadBeast

ThreatBeast

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Threadbeast sadly doesn’t offer returns or exchanges- aside from wrong sizes. In this model, you’re directly buying the clothes. I understand that they want to keep prices low, but I’d love to see at least some exceptions made. 

Winner: Stitch Fix

In terms of policy alone, Stitch Fix offers more flexibility if you don’t like something. Do I wish that the try-on window was longer? Yes. 

Overall Customer Experience 

Gathering my impressions, research, and more, I took to the community and sought out real customer reviews. 

Stitch Fix

Stitch Fix

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This is where Stitch Fix falls flat, and it makes sense, given the recent updates on the company’s history and complaints. Sadly, Stitch Fix is mostly not delivering what customers want. Complaints centered around poor quality, receiving items they requested not to and overall a feeling that their boxes were not truly personalized. Add to that complaint about not being able to cancel, mediocre styles, and poor customer service, and Stitch Fix is not a well-rated service. Many say that quality has declined, and, while some do like Stitch Fix, average ratings on independent review sites are 2 to 2.5 out of 5 stars. 

ThreadBeast

ThreatBeast

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ThreadBeast sadly doesn’t do much better. While there are fewer consumer complaints on BBB (Better Business Bureau) it was just below 2 out of 5 stars on Trustpilot. Here and there, you’ll see customers happy with their boxes but the overall picture isn’t great. Many hated the no returns policy and felt like the clothing didn’t live up to their standards. Others rated it as just average, at best. 

Winner: Neither

I hate doing reviews where I don’t fully recommend either company, but I have to be honest. Both ThreadBeast and Stitch Fix have substantial complaints and low levels of customer satisfaction.

Frequently Asked Questions

Question: What is going on with Stitch Fix? (stylists, failing)

Answer: Stitch Fix is one of the most well-known clothing subscriptions. On the surface, it also seems like it’s the most – but it’s run into several issues in recent years. An August 2021 report discussed the stricter schedules and increasing pressure on stylists- and subsequent stylists leaving the company. In June 2022, Stitch Fix fired roughly 15 percent of its employees, citing the rising cost of inflation. The CEO was also forced to address customer complaints surrounding a lack of transparency in 2021. 

Question: Where does Stitch Fix get its clothes from?

Answer: Stitch Fix clothes come from a wide array of suppliers- all directly from the brands. While it’s unclear how Stitch  Fix decides what to buy, it’s likely related to their algorithm systems. In addition to name brands, Stitch Fix also produces its line of clothing (which is also available through clothing subscriptions). 

Question: How much is the baller plan ThreadBeast?

Answer: The Baller Plan for Threadbeast costs $290 (2022) and is the newest plan from ThreadBeast. This plan includes extra features such as premium accessories, tops, bottoms, and other pieces. This expensive plan, though, can be reduced down to a cheaper plan at any time. It’s one of the most luxurious and expensive plans in the clothing subscription market. This comes at a time when many clothing subscriptions are changing options, downsizing, or changing their marketing strategy. 

Question: Is Threadbeast real?

Answer: Threadbeast is a genuine clothing subscription service that is based in Los Angelos, California. They can be contacted either via email ([email protected]) or via their toll-free number, 1-844-232-7885. The founder and CEO of Threadbeast are Uday Singh, and you may have seen their ads if you’re an Instagram user or a Facebook user. While they are a real company, you can’t visit them easily in person as a customer. 

Final Verdict: Try A Different Service

On the service, there’s a lot to appreciate about ThreadBeast and Stitch Fix. If Stitch Fix invested more in customer service and personalization, then I’d recommend it. But for now, I recommend sticking with one of my alternatives below. 

Final Recommendations

Not feeling ThreadBeast? Need women’s or kids’ clothing? I have a few recommendations for the best alternatives to Stitch Fix and ThreadBeast:

For Contemporary Women’s: Trendsend by Evereve

Trendsend is a clothing subscription service that caters to busy women looking for a stylish update to their wardrobe. Like many of the popular clothing subscription services, you get a personalized styling quiz- but with the added touch of sharing social media photos and inspiration. Every shipment comes with 2-3 pieces of clothing that you can keep or return- a very similar approach and a natural alternative to Stitch Fix. Learn More Here

For Plus Size Women’s: Gwynnie Bee 

Plus size
Image From Erin Jamieson

There are several plus-sized subscription services- and I’m happy to see more clothing subscriptions, in general, become more size-inclusive. But for a plus-size specific service, my recommendation is Gwynnie Bee. It has far better reviews than other companies, and is a fair go-to if you want casual and work clothes. What’s unique about this subscription is that it works like a clothing rental. That’s great for someone who wants to constantly update their wardrobe. But, as a bonus, you can also buy anything you love for a discounted price. Learn More Here

For Men & Women: Personal Shopper at Prime Wardrobe (Amazon) 

For women
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Turns out that Amazon has a practical clothing subscription service with personalized styling. It’s a natural alternative to Stitch Fix, where you’ll take a quiz and preview items before they’re shipped. You can even make personalized styling requests and you have a week to try everything on and decide what you want to keep. There’s a wide selection of clothes and something for everyone, no matter your style preferences. Learn More Here

For Kids: Fab Kids 

For kids
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It’s hard to find a great kid’s clothing service that offers solid options and has high levels of customer satisfaction. Luckily, Fab Kids pleases most customers and has some solid features. Fab Kids offers everything from quirky shoes to full outfits, tops, and more. The styles are fresh and updated. VIP membership allows you to shop limited collections, with free returns and exchanges for up to 60 days. Learn More Here

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